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Discovering Regionally Specific Wines From Australia
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By Jenny Benzie of Pour Sip Savor
April 2012

When dining at your favorite restaurant or browsing the shelves of the local neighborhood wine store, US consumers are still looking for a great value in their wine selection with so many choices available these days.  Value regions that may come to mind typically lie on the outskirts of more well-known regions: Pernand Vergelleses is next to Corton-Charlemagne, you can't get to Montsant without going through Priorat and Sant'Antimo has no problem having some many wine 'cousins' in Tuscany.  This regional recognition for lesser-known wine regions is common for most Old World wines, but not so easily discernable for New World wines that highlight grape varietal first in their labeling regime versus promotion of a regional designation. This type of labeling and promotion is the beginning of many challenges Australian wines have in marketing regionally specific wines to the US market.

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'Organic' as a Brand?
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By Jenny Benzie of Pour Sip Savor
March 2012

Walk into almost any market these days and you are bound to see a section of Organic food or wine products.  They are listed as such under detailed menu items in restaurants and often asked for by name.  'By name?,' you ask.  If Organic is now considered a brand, it is a brand doesn't belong to just one company and is definitely a 'label' that is of interest to consumers.


Back in the day when you bought your fruits and vegetables from the roadside stand, you knew who the farmer was that sold them and where the farm was located.  Same thing with local wine production as you filled your glass container at the winery itself.  But with the advent of commercialism, big city living and less purchasing of food stuffs from the source, consumers want a way to know where the products they are consuming come from and also to have a measure of quality as to what is in the package.


This demand for these types of products from consumers is the idea behind Organic certifications that define an agricultural process, yet do not promise the product to be more beneficial or less impactful on one's health.

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The Use of Oak in Winemaking
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By Jenny Benzie of Pour Sip Savor
January 2012

Is that a 2X4 that I smell in my wine glass?  Wine tasting notes often refer to wines as oaky, but what exactly does that mean?  The use of oak in winemaking can play an important role in the final product in several different ways.

First, consider the source of the wood.  Most American oak barrels typically come from the species Quercus alba, which is a white oak species.  This oak has wider grains and lower wood tannins.  The wider grains allows for a quicker, more concentrated release of aromas into the wine.  American oak typically imparts flavors with sweeter nuances like vanilla, along with coconut (think sunscreen) and dill (think pickles).  This oak is used for big, powerful reds and Chardonnays from warmer climates. 

In France, Quercus petrea is more common for its finer grain and richer aromatic components.  This produces silky, softer style tannins.  Warm sensations such as baking spices (cinnamon, clove, nutmeg) are more apparent with this type of wood.  Some winemakers choose their wood from one specific forest as each forest may add slightly different nuances to the final blend.  Due to the finer grain of French oak, less of the tree may be used in barrel production.  Therefore, the cost of French barrels is more than that of American barrels.

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Holiday Gift List Ideas
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Some slow idea to share this holiday season. Cheers!

CSA  Share

Chelsea Green Books------We still have copies of the terra madre book

Heirloom Starter Plants

Slow Food Event Pack

Farm Tour

Membership - Plenty of time to submit online

More ideas coming. Add your suggestions and finds in the comments.

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Savor a Slow Summer
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The dog days of summer have arrived. Whether you are looking to stay in, get outside, or travel, here are a few tips from your friends at Slow Food Glades to Coast on how to Savor the rest of your Slow Summer.

Stay Home

Suggested Reading
Plant a tropical tree
Plan your fall garden
Invite your neighbors to dinner
Start composting

Get Out

Get involved with a community garden project
Take your children to a tropical fruit garden/festival

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